Thursday, October 17, 2013

When soccer trumps baseball

Some bad news in the world of baseball. And college football. And the NFL. Not that we really care about the other two. But we care about baseball, don’t we. Yeah. It’s the greatest sport, but we always hear about how it’s dying, and no longer relevant. That’s bull, in my opinion. Baseball is alive and well, and has survived many issues that have broken other leagues. 

But to be fair, it is probably not the most watched sport in the world. That would have to be soccer. While baseball is played in most countries nowadays, soccer still remains supreme as the top sport in most of them. Usually because it’s the cheapest to play growing up, and a lack of organized leagues or competitions for many of the other sports.

However, back to the main point, baseball is alive and well, and deep into the playoffs. While college football and the NFL are back, you would think the run to the Series would trump all other sports in television viewership in the states. But it seems it doesn’t. It’s not either of the footballs. At least in some of our major metropolitan areas. It seems soccer reigns supreme in many American cities. According to TV by the Numbers, the FIFA World Cup Qualifier between Mexico and Panama on October 11th, a Friday, outdrew all other sports in the land, regardless of language:

Regardless of language, UniMás was the highest rated broadcast station during the Mexico vs. Panama match (9:30 p.m.-11:30 p.m. ET):
·         Among Persons 2+ in Los Angeles, Miami, Houston, Dallas and Phoenix
·         Among Adults 18-49 and Adults 18-34 in Los Angeles, Miami, Houston, Dallas, Chicago, San Francisco, Phoenix and Sacramento
But it wasn’t just sports that the soccer match outdrew. Oh no, that wasn’t enough: 
During the Mexico vs. Panama match (9:30 p.m.-11:30 p.m. ET), UniMás stations had higher viewership that the ABC, CBS, NBC and FOX stations combined:
·         Among Persons 2+ in Los Angeles
·         Among Adults 18-49 in Los Angeles, Miami, Houston and Sacramento
·         Among Adults 18-34 in Los Angeles, Miami, Houston, Dallas, San Francisco, Phoenix and Sacramento
But they weren’t just picking on those poor unfortunate’s of us who only speak English:
During the Mexico vs. Panama match (9:30 p.m.-11:30 p.m. ET), UniMás stations had higher viewership that the Telemundo, Azteca, MundoFox and Estrella stations combined:
·         Among Persons 2+ and Adults 18-49 in Los Angeles, New York, Miami, Houston, Dallas, Chicago, San Francisco, Phoenix and Sacramento
·         Among Adults 18-34 in Los Angeles, Miami, Houston, Dallas, Chicago, San Francisco, Phoenix and Sacramento
And to add insult to injury, it wasn’t just Friday night viewing that got waylaid by the quest for Brazil: 
The Mexico vs. Panama match on UniMás stations was the #1 broadcast program of the day in the following markets:
·         Among Adults 18-49 in Los Angeles, Miami, Houston, Dallas, Chicago, San Francisco, Phoenix and Sacramento
·         Among Adults 18-34 in Los Angeles, Houston, Dallas, Chicago and Sacramento
·          Among Persons 2+ in Los Angeles, Miami and Houston
There are some more numbers in the article, so please go check it out. Now, obviously, those cities have a high Hispanic population, and none them save Los Angeles had a team in the playoffs. The Dodgers did open the NLCS that night, and are supposed to have a huge following among the Hispanic population, specifically the Mexicans. But I guess they were more interested in what was going on back home then in the city they live in.

Of the cities listed, these are there rankings in size:

Los Angeles – 2nd
Miami – 9th
Houston – 10th
Dallas – 8th
Chicago – 3rd
San Francisco – 5th
Phoenix – 14th
Sacramento – 24th

So 8 of the top 24. Just to provide as many numbers as possible, here is the percentage of Hispanics in each city:

Los Angeles – 45%
Miami – 64%
Houston – 37%
Dallas – 28%
Chicago – 22%
San Francisco – 55%
Phoenix – 41%
Sacramento – 27%

I don’t think in any way this means baseball is dying out. It does prove my theory that the Mexican population makes up the majority of Dodgers fans in Los Angeles, but that’s an internal issue to them. Baseball is alive and well, and is far from needing life support.

What I do find interesting, however, is that fact that as the Hispanic population goes up in the country, tracking a similar rise in Hispanic players in MLB from all over the hemisphere, you have to question if the audience size is keeping track with the on-field growth. We keep hearing things about how the rise in Hispanic players needs to bring about a new way of marketing the game, or the way we treat players, as well as adjustments by the existing fan base. But is that what is really happening?

The NBA is a game largely played by black players and attended by white fans. The same has been said of the NFL. I don’t have those numbers, and I don’t care. What they do isn’t important to me; it’s just what I’ve heard most of my life. But is the same true of baseball? Will it become a game played by minorities, but watched by white people? Aren’t the growing crowds of Hispanics supposed to be the new gold mine? But if they aren’t watching, will it matter.

I find it interesting that the Dodgers couldn’t outdraw the Mexican soccer team, but having lived in Los Angeles, I’m not actually surprised. The Mexican population, who makes up a vast majority of the viewership of all the channels, as well as Dodger fans, have always been portrayed as looking back to Mexico over anything that happens in L.A. As to the other cities, maybe it’s the same. Baseball is definitely holding its own. Can we say the same for the expected Hispanic market?

Is the Hispanic viewership of baseball a boom or a bust? Obviously not when soccer is on television.

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